PEST MANAGEMENT
MOSQUITOES
INFO ABOUT MOSQUITOES
Mosquito adults are small, delicate, two-winged flies. At first you might mistake them for the widely distributed, non-biting midges.

However, female mosquitoes differ from similar insects because of their long, slender proboscis, a tubular feeding organ adapted for piercing skin and sucking blood.

If you were to view a mosquito with a hand lens, you would see another characteristic that distinguishes mosquitoes from closely related flies—small scales cover their long, slender wings.
Male mosquitoes also have scale-covered wings, but they use their proboscises, or “beaks,” only for sucking plant juices and other sources of sugar rather than blood.

Mosquito larvae, or wigglers, usually are black or brown and occur in stagnant or nearly still water in surface pools, tree holes, or man-made containers such as abandoned tires. Culex and Aedes larvae have a distinctive siphon, or air tube, at the rear of their bodies, which is lacking in Anopheles.

The next immature stage, the pupa, or tumbler, is aquatic, small, comma-shaped, and usually a dark colour.
HOW DO WE MANAGE IT?
Environmental Essentials approach to mosquito management has been ‘Search & Destroy’.

Therefore, all sources that create stagnant water will be advised to be removed or repaired by our specialist.

Pesticide measures are used to manage the adult population of mosquitoes.